Didatics Inteventions2021-10-15T18:28:34+02:00

Gifted & Talented Education

Gifted Education in the regular classroom

Methodologies

Research-based practices

Teaching

The National Guidelines (2012 and 2018) highlight an important educational objective: to exploit the potential of each student. The Italian school legislation provides in references that encourage teachers and educators to consider the inclinations, potential and interests of the pupils in the everyday teaching. See for example: L n. 148/1990; L. n. 53/2003; DL n. 59/2004.

How? Keeping the Italian context in mind, with our culture and our sensitivity, if we go back through history we find normative sources that provide educational enrichment, such as: L. n. 440/1997 and DPR n. 275/1999, even if it is thought for disadvantages children.

According to De Angelis (2017) and Brazzolotto (2018; 2019) Italian teachers would feel very disoriented when in a classroom where there is a student with giftedness, as they would not know how to differentiate teaching.

Students with giftedness show specific educational needs (as stated in ministerial note 562 of 3/04/2019), needs that in some cases (NOT always) could cause a school failure.  The most common features of gifted children are: curiosity, sensitivity, divergent thought, perfectionism, creativity (Zanetti, 2017; Mormando, 2011), intensity. Neihart and Betts (2010) have identified 6 profiles of gifted students. They are therefore a very heterogeneous group.

When there is a gifted child in the mixed classroom, I recommend, first of all, to favor a pedagogical approach, channeling all the energies answering the question: “what can I do to include this student?” ; trying to put in the background the “challenge” of wanting to label the student correctly (see Brazzolotto, 2018), answering the question: “but what is it? Autism? DOP? ADHD? Gifted?”. The needs that the student manifests in the classroom should be the backbone of design and not the label. The student does NOT coincide with his diagnosis/evaluation.

GIFTED 2E

Who are they?
How to recognize them?
What to do in class?

The twice- exceptionality indicates the comorbidity of giftedness and a learning disorder. In the scientific literature it is called twice-exceptional (2E).

For more information I have attached  a presentation that I wrote for the Conference AID (Italian Association Dyslexia) in Amandola (25/08/2017) and replicated in Sassari (5/10/2017).

DOWNLOAD THE SLIDE

Emotionality

What is emotional hypersensitivity?
How to recognize it?
What to do?

Dabrowski (1977) calls “emotional hypersensitivity” that “ability” to perceive, through the five senses, in an amplified way.
Children and young people with giftedness have a hypersensitivity that sometimes (NOT always) has a negative impact on the emotions management. We all know that the bigger the load, the harder it is to handle it.
Teachers and parents should be aware of this characteristic as amplified perception leads in some cases to as many amplified reactions.

Hypersensitivity combined with awareness could cause episodes of anger and frustration. The strategy I suggest is “metacognitive” which is to help student in school to understand what causes some exaggerated reactions and how they can be managed.
We believe, however, that in the most “difficult” cases it is necessary to undertake a path of psychotherapy, with qualified and competent personnel also in the field of giftedness.
Metacognitive reflections would be better to lead them after the moment of crisis, or with a relationship one by one or, maybe later, involving even peers

Children and young people with giftedness seem to experience a discomfort at school, resulting in school failure and/or dissatisfaction, as in some schools they are not (re)known and the school program is not adapted

AFTER THIS BASIC PREMISE, ADVICE TO DIFFERENTIATE AND ENRICH TEACHING, THIS MEANS:

offer various ways to learn at the same time

allow student to choose (after sharing rules and discipline)

make interdisciplinary links (involving colleagues)

reduce frontal teaching moments (without eliminating them altogether)

promote group work

leave time for independent study and deepening

promoting authentic tasks

remain consistent and faithful to what is “promised” in the classroom

try to avoid prejudices about “labels” of students

in the event that it is evident a double exception create a Personalized Plan

when you want to undertake a path of enhancement of talents provide a Personalized Plan to Talent Develop (Brazzolotto, 2019)

agree and/or share learning objectives and evaluation methods (the heading is a useful tool)

listen to the experiences and observations of parents and believe in their narration (sometimes students with giftedness may have two profiles even “opposed” at home and at school)

Gifted & Talented Education

Gifted Education in the regular classroom
Methodologies
Research-based practices

Teaching

The National Guidelines (2012 and 2018) highlight an important educational objective: to exploit the potential of each student. The Italian school legislation provides in references that encourage teachers and educators to consider the inclinations, potential and interests of the pupils in the everyday teaching. See for example: L n. 148/1990; L. n. 53/2003; DL n. 59/2004.

How? Keeping the Italian context in mind, with our culture and our sensitivity, if we go back through history we find normative sources that provide educational enrichment, such as: L. n. 440/1997 and DPR n. 275/1999, even if it is thought for disadvantages children.

According to De Angelis (2017) and Brazzolotto (2018; 2019) Italian teachers would feel very disoriented when in  a classroom where there is a student with giftedness, as they would not know how to differentiate teaching.

Students with giftedness show specific educational needs (as stated in ministerial note 562 of 3/04/2019), needs that in some cases (NOT always) could cause a school failure.  The most common features of gifted children are: curiosity, sensitivity, divergent thought, perfectionism, creativity (Zanetti, 2017; Mormando, 2011), intensity. Neihart and Betts (2010) have identified 6 profiles of gifted students. They are therefore a very heterogeneous group.

Gifted 2E

Who are they?
How to recognize them?
What to do in class?

The twice- exceptionality indicates the comorbidity of giftedness and a learning disorder. In the scientific literature it is called twice-exceptional (2E).

For more information I have attached  a presentation that I wrote for the Conference AID (Italian Association Dyslexia) in Amandola (25/08/2017) and replicated in Sassari (5/10/2017).

DOWNLOAD THE SLIDE

Emotionality

What is emotional hypersensitivity?
How to recognize it?
What to do?

Dabrowski (1977) calls “emotional hypersensitivity” that “ability” to perceive, through the five senses, in an amplified way.

Children and young people with giftedness have a hypersensitivity that sometimes (NOT always) has a negative impact on the emotions management. We all know that the bigger the load, the harder it is to handle it.
Teachers and parents should be aware of this characteristic as amplified perception leads in some cases to as many amplified reactions.

Hypersensitivity combined with awareness could cause episodes of anger and frustration. The strategy I suggest is “metacognitive” which is to help student in school to understand what causes some exaggerated reactions and how they can be managed.
We believe, however, that in the most “difficult” cases it is necessary to undertake a path of psychotherapy, with qualified and competent personnel also in the field of giftedness.
Metacognitive reflections would be better to lead them after the moment of crisis, or with a relationship one by one or, maybe later, involving even peers.

Children and young people with giftedness seem to experience a discomfort at school, resulting in school failure and/or dissatisfaction, as in some schools they are not (re)known and the school program is not adapted

When there is a gifted child in the mixed classroom, I recommend, first of all, to favor a pedagogical approach, channeling all the energies answering the question: “what can I do to include this student?” ; trying to put in the background the “challenge” of wanting to label the student correctly (see Brazzolotto, 2018), answering the question: “but what is it? Autism? DOP? ADHD? Gifted?”. The needs that the student manifests in the classroom should be the backbone of design and not the label. The student does NOT coincide with his diagnosis/evaluation.

AFTER THIS BASIC PREMISE, ADVICE TO DIFFERENTIATE AND ENRICH TEACHING, THIS MEANS:

  • offer various ways to learn at the same time

  • allow student to choose (after sharing rules and discipline)

  • make interdisciplinary links (involving colleagues)

  • reduce frontal teaching moments (without eliminating them altogether)

  • promote group work

  • leave time for independent study and deepening

  • promoting authentic tasks

  • remain consistent and faithful to what is “promised” in the classroom

  • try to avoid prejudices about “labels” of students

  • in the event that it is evident a double exception create a Personalized Plan

  • when you want to undertake a path of enhancement of talents provide a Personalized Plan to Talent Develop (Brazzolotto, 2019)

  • agree and/or share learning objectives and evaluation methods (the heading is a useful tool)

  • listen to the experiences and observations of parents and believe in their narration (sometimes students with giftedness may have two profiles even “opposed” at home and at school)

I propose various educational services face to face and online

Personalized & Individualized Plan

building activities

virtual camp

realization PDP

teacher training

FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT ME

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